Curator Duchess of Cambridge

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“The Duchess of Cambridge is to put her history of art degree to good use as she curates her first exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery, in a photographic celebration of childhood.

The Duchess, who is patron of the gallery, has selected key Victorian photographs for a special “Patron’s Trail”, which will see her write labels telling visitors about the works.

The extraordinary project will see her follow in the footsteps of Victoria and Albert, who were enthusiastic supporters of photography from its invention, and make use of her St Andrews degree.

Writing about her involvement, the Duchess, who according to her husband takes photographs of Prince George and Princess Charlotte every day, called herself an “enthusiastic amateur photographer”, disclosing she wrote her undergraduate thesis on 19th century images.

The exhibition, entitled Victorian Giants: The Birth Of Art Photography, is based on rarely-seen works from groundbreaking photographers Oscar Rejlander, Lewis Carroll, Julia Margaret Cameron and Lady Clementina Hawarden, some of which have been borrowed from the Royal Collection.”

Source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/02/16/duchess-cambridge-puts-degree-good-use-curates-victorian-photography/

Photo from Google Images

20 types of Prosecco on offer in London bar

This wasn’t the opening of any new bar, but the UK’s first prosecco house, and if anything will inspire us to leave the warmth of our homes on a cold February nights, it’s the thought of being in the same room as a jeroboam of the fizzy stuff.

Collectively, the nation guzzled a third of the world’s prosecco last year, when more than 410 million bottles were produced. We sipped, slurped and sloshed more of the Italian bubbles than any other country and woke up feeling flat the next day, saying we’d never do it again. Then we did. Again and again.

Now, proseccoheads can drink more than 20 different types in one bar, as long as they can stay upright. Prosecco House is serving extra brut, extra dry, millesimato, cuvée, rose and even sugar-free bottles ranging from £30 to £70 (with cheaper takeaway options, too). Just don’t ask for a flute; it’s all served in wine glasses – “properly” – with lumps of Parmesan instead of crisps.

Following the trend for one dish restaurants serving only hotdogs, say, or burgers (and lobster), one drink bars are now cropping up everywhere. For the first time we’re choosing what we want to drink before we even choose the bar, then working out where we need to go. Gin palaces might have started the trend, but now there are bars serving only whisky, Japanese whisky, sherry, tequila and rum.

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Article from: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/men/style/gin-palaces-prosecco-houses-one-drink-bar-rise/

When in Rome…

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Did you ever wonder who first said “When in Rome, do as the Romans do?”  The following source explains: http://www.italiannotebook.com/local-interest/origin-do-as-romans-do/

Do you know the expression’s origin? St. Ambrose, way back in 387 A.D.

As the story goes, when St. Augustine arrived in Milan to assume his role as Professor of Rhetoric for the Imperial Court, he observed that the Church did not fast on Saturdays as it did in Rome.

Confused, Agostino consulted with the wiser and older Ambrogio (Ambrose), then the Bishop of Milan, who replied: “When I am at Rome, I fast on Saturday; when I am at Milan I do not. Follow the custom of the Church where you are.”

In 1621, British author Robert Burton, in his classic writing Anatomy of Melancholy, edited St. Ambrose’s remark to read: “When they are at Rome, they do there as they see done.”

Down through the years, Burton’s turn of the St. Ambrose quote was further edited, anonymously, into what is widely repeated today on a daily basis by some traveler, somewhere, trying to adjust to his/her new or temporary surroundings.