Art is a part of daily life in Italy

Italy was a place where art was part of daily routine. It was in the fabric and facades of the buildings and in the way towns and villages.  Aestheticism was instinctive, a common trait, as if it were one of the senses. Artfulness was ubiquitous, from the wrapping of one’s purchases in a shop to the arrangement of food on a plate.

The most common word in the language appeared to be bella, which prefixed everything from the morning espresso to the design of a dress. Great effort – and great importance – was placed on how things looked. Tuscany’s landscape was the ultimate expression of this. It was the view that travellers dreamt of, composed who knew how by diverse hands over centuries.

It even smelled wonderful, of clean air and woodsmoke, of rosemary and new leather, of frying garlic and pungent parmigiano.

Taylor, Alan F.. Appointment in Arezzo: My Life with Muriel Spark (Kindle Locations 859-865). Birlinn Ltd. Kindle Edition.

 

How do I love thee, let me count the ways. Elizabeth Barrett Browning and her husband in Florence.


The Casa Guidi, as we see it today, has the same number of rooms and the same plan as it was when the Robert and Elizabeth Barret Browningrented it in 1847. The Brownings lived here happily for many years, and Elizabeth died there in 1861.
The Brownings took two years to furnish the apartment, buying at high cost one or two precious pieces such as the golden mirror of the living room, while most of the paintings and other furniture was found in small Florentine shops.

 

P5180062

https://www.visittuscany.com/it/attrazioni/casa-guidi-firenze/

Casa_Guidi_01Casa_Guidi_Browning

In restoring the property, the Landmark Trust and Eton College tried to maintain the original atmosphere, preventing the apartment from   looking like a museum.


There are currently some paintings and furniture that belonged to    both the Barrett family and the Browning family and that have been   generously donated to Casa Guidi, but overall the furnishings remain similar to those of the 19th century. The walls and ceilings in the  living room and main bedroom and the ceiling of the poet's studio    have been restored with the original colors of the period. All doors and fireplaces are original.


After the poet's death, the Commune commemorated her life placed an  inscription on the door (composed by Niccolò Tommaseo) according to  which her poetry had created a golden ring that binds Italy and      England.

 

Accesso handicap:
Non accessibile a persone su sedia a ruote

Contatti:
P.zza San Felice, 8
Telefono: 055 354457
E-mail: elena.capolino@fastwebnet.it

Hitchcock’s The Lady Vanishes

 

The_Lady_Vanishes_1938_Poster

The Lady Vanishes, released in 1938, was Hitchcock’s last British film (until the 1970s), and is considered to be his finest. Hitchcock’s 3 previous films had not done well at the box office, but The Lady was extremely successful in both the U.K. and the U.S.A. and helped launch Hitchcock in Hollywood.

 

The plot of The Lady Vanishes has clear references to the political situation leading up to World War II.  It is hard to imagine yourself back in 1938, before the world would experience the atrocities of the 2nd World War.  Spies on trains and coded messages drive the plot.

I recently watched the film and was surprised by how slowly the plot moves in the first third of the film.  Even though this film is always rated in the top 40 best British films, for me it was surprising that Hitchcock directed it.  But, that is just my opinion and I am no expert! For a more positive assessment of the movie, see this source: https://www.theguardian.com/film/filmblog/2012/jul/24/my-favourite-hitchcock-lady-vanishes

 

Artwork hidden from the Nazis

With the Academy Awards coming up soon and two of the best films nominated for best picture (Darkest Hour and Dunkirk) dealing with art hidden from Nazis in the U.K., comes this timely exhibition.

The National Gallery in London celebrates how it hid priceless paintings from Nazis in a Welsh mine. The gallery’s display will recall the summer of 1940 when, following Dunkirk, the British feared invasion.

TELEMMGLPICT000154393334_trans_NvBQzQNjv4BqoVHpc64Dw_9TYL9Y5RROLWujWjXObyQ1V6t2aEy3Fog

The new exhibition shows 24 archival photographs detailing how paintings were removed, packed, transported and stashed in a disused slate mine in Snowdonia, along with a picture of how it looks today.

A new 30 minute film about the rescue mission, capturing an “immersive” dance and spoken word performance, has been commissioned to accompany it, to be broadcast on BBC Two.

TELEMMGLPICT000154393264_trans_NvBQzQNjv4BqW-Lc0TAiyYzC8hrrx9reNKSpleVaApsUen8Ng0BEdKI

In 1940, the Bristish feared for the safety of the national art collection: Winston Churchill is known to have personally intervened to veto a plan to take them to Canada by ship, fearing a u-boat attack could leave paintings lost at sea.

Instead, curators agreed to hide works in the Manod mine, enlarging its entrance with explosives and building small brick “bungalows” inside to protect them from damp.

Monitoring the conditions the paintings were kept in further led to “valuable discoveries” about how best to protect them, a spokesman for the gallery said, explaining air conditioning was then added to the renovated London gallery after the war.

TELEMMGLPICT000154393093_trans_NvBQzQNjv4BqqVzuuqpFlyLIwiB6NTmJwfSVWeZ_vEN7c6bHu2jJnT8

20 types of Prosecco on offer in London bar

This wasn’t the opening of any new bar, but the UK’s first prosecco house, and if anything will inspire us to leave the warmth of our homes on a cold February nights, it’s the thought of being in the same room as a jeroboam of the fizzy stuff.

Collectively, the nation guzzled a third of the world’s prosecco last year, when more than 410 million bottles were produced. We sipped, slurped and sloshed more of the Italian bubbles than any other country and woke up feeling flat the next day, saying we’d never do it again. Then we did. Again and again.

Now, proseccoheads can drink more than 20 different types in one bar, as long as they can stay upright. Prosecco House is serving extra brut, extra dry, millesimato, cuvée, rose and even sugar-free bottles ranging from £30 to £70 (with cheaper takeaway options, too). Just don’t ask for a flute; it’s all served in wine glasses – “properly” – with lumps of Parmesan instead of crisps.

Following the trend for one dish restaurants serving only hotdogs, say, or burgers (and lobster), one drink bars are now cropping up everywhere. For the first time we’re choosing what we want to drink before we even choose the bar, then working out where we need to go. Gin palaces might have started the trend, but now there are bars serving only whisky, Japanese whisky, sherry, tequila and rum.

images-2

 

Article from: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/men/style/gin-palaces-prosecco-houses-one-drink-bar-rise/