Florence’s tiny little wine windows

One of the hundreds of interesting things you see when walking around the city of Florence are these small windows, measuring about 12 inches wide by 15 inches tall, cut into the masonry of some major palazzi.  There are hundreds of them in Florence.

The buchette del vino (“small holes [for] wine”) were added to the buildings by entrepreneurial families who produced wine on their country estates and thought to themselves, “why not sell some in Florence on a glass by glass, or a refilled bottle by bottle, basis?”

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Together, these windows form a collection of Renaissance-era vestiges of a once-popular and admirably no-fuss form of wine sales.

Without exception, I have never seen one of these windows open.  They are usually boarded up, sometimes in quite decorative ways.

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But now, an organization is working to preserve—and help reopen—the city’s “wine windows.”

“These small architectural features are a very special commercial and social phenomenon unique to Florence and Tuscany,” Matteo Faglia, a founding member of the Associazione Culturale Buchette del Vino, told Unfiltered via email. “Although they are a minor cultural patrimony, nevertheless, they are an integral part of the richest area of the world in terms of works of art and monuments—Tuscany.”

The buchette first came into vogue in the 16th century, when wealthy Florentines began to expand into landowning—notably, owning vineyards—in the Tuscan countryside. The aristocrats’ new zeal for selling wine was matched only by that for avoiding paying taxes on selling wine, so they devised the simplest model for wine retail they could: on-demand, to-go, literally hand-sold through a hole in the wall of their residences.

It was convenient for drinkers, too: Knock on the window with your empty bottle, and the server, a cantiniere, would answer; upon receiving the bottle and payment, he would return with a full bottle of wine. Buchette eventually became popular enough that nearly every Florentine family with vineyards and a palace in Florence had a wine window, and soon the trend spread to nearby Tuscan towns like Siena and Pisa.

The windows stayed open for the next three centuries, but by the beginning of the 20th century, more social wine tavernas had spread throughout the city, with better-quality wine, better company and equally easy access to a flask.

By 2015, most Florentines had lost track of their wine windows, if not vandalized them. That year, the Associazione was founded, with a mission to identify, map and preserve the buchette—nearly 300 catalogued so far.

And this summer provided a new boost to their work: One restaurant has cracked open its buchetta anew for business. Babae is the first restaurant to re-embrace the old tradition, filling glasses for passersby through their buchetta for a few hours each evening.

It’s a welcome development to the lovers of wine windows. “Although the ways of selling wine have obviously changed since the wine windows were fully active … this small gesture, which highlights a niche of Florentine history, is very welcome,” said Faglia, “to help to keep alive this antique and unique way of selling one of Tuscany’s most important agricultural and commercial products: its wine.”

This new association even has a Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/buchettedelvino/

http://buchettedelvino.org/home%20eng/index.html

https://www.winespectator.com/articles/florence-s-forgotten-renaissance-wine-windows-are-open-again-for-business

Great British baking

Are you a fan of the tv show, The Great British Bake-off?  I am!  I learned so much about baking in general and about British desserts in particular from watching that show.

Yesterday I was in the cantina of St. Paul’s Cathedral in London, and was delighted to see Lemon Drizzle Cake, Bakewell tart, and other desserts I learned about on the show.

I tried the Bakewell tart, and it was tasty.  It needed some salt to balance all the sugar.  But, that’s just me.

 

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Sizzling summer in Florence

L’estate e’ arrivata!!!  Summer has arrived!  Big time!  Florence is sizzling, even earlier this year that the last 2!

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The thermostat rarely dips below 90, even at night, it seems.

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The city of Florence prepared these great posters of Estate Fiorentina 2019! I think Dante is going to want to drop that red cloak, or maybe he just finished swimming in the Arno and is using the coat as a beach towel?  That makes perfect sense to my heat-fried brain!

But, in Florence, you can always cool off with these summertime fruits (candies)!  Have a great summer, wherever you are!

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P.S. I’m not a fan of hot summer weather.  I’m planning another getaway next month.  Here’s a hint: fullsizeoutput_1187

 

I’m praying London’s weather stays like this!!