For Dante, all was finally forgiven

In June 2008, seven centuries after Dante’s banishment, the city council of Florence passed a motion rescinding his sentence.  It was one further ploy aimed at the repatriation of his remains, but it was no more successful than the previous attempts, and Dante’s remains still lie in a modest tomb beside the fifth-century Church of San Francesco in Ravenna.

Jones, Ted. Florence and Tuscany: A Literary Guide for Travellers (The I.B.Tauris Literary Guides for Travellers) (p. 37). I.B.Tauris. Kindle Edition.

August 4, 1944: Florence, Italy and Anne Frank in Amsterdam

As the Allied Forces entered Florence in the early hours of August 4, 1944,  the brigade Sinigaglia, the division Arno, and the brigade Lanciotto were enthusiastically welcomed into the Oltrarno district. The Allies allowed the partisans to keep their weapons; the Florentine men then started a roundup, searching for the German snipers that were firing at the unarmed populace. These snipers wanted to terrify the population and to slow the progression of the Allies, particularly in the districts of San Frediano, Conventino, and San Niccolò.

Meanwhile, the Nazis were still on the right or north side of the Arno. The military base of the partisans, the CTLN (Comitato Toscano di Liberazione Nazionale, Tuscan Comitate of National Liberation), was installed in the society Larderello, in Piazza Strozzi n. 2.

At first, the command of the third zone in via Roma n. 4, led by the Partito d’Azione, acted as the connection center. In order to follow both the Germans and Allied movements, a sentry was stationed atop the Cupola del Duomo. The personnel stationed there included a deputy commander, a political commissar, and a chief from the first commander corps.

As for the Florentines, on August 4, only a few of them attempted to leave home. But the following day, without food or water, women and boys started to queue in front of the town’s water fountains and doorways with available wells, as well as in front of the bakeries. The few peddlers selling fruit and vegetables were extremely busy.

To be continued.

Sources:

http://diariodiunfiorentino.altervista.org/liberation-florence-11-august-1944/?doing_wp_cron=1564842755.6783099174499511718750

http://diariodiunfiorentino.altervista.org/the-insurrection-of-florence/?doing_wp_cron=1564846863.0551791191101074218750

 

Meanwhile, in Amsterdam, a place also occupied by the Nazis, on August 4, 1944, after 25 months in hiding, Anne Frank and the seven others in their secret hiding place were discovered by the Gestapo. The German secret state police had learned about the hiding place from an anonymous tipster, who has never been definitively identified.

After their arrest, the Frank family and their fellow Jewish associates, were sent by the Gestapo to Westerbork, a holding camp in the northern Netherlands. From there, in September 1944, the group was transported by freight train to the Auschwitz-Birkenau extermination and concentration camp complex in German-occupied Poland. Anne and her sister, Margot Frank, were spared immediate death in the Auschwitz gas chambers and instead were sent to Bergen-Belsen, a concentration camp in northern Germany.

In February 1945, the Frank sisters died of typhus at Bergen-Belsen; their bodies were thrown into a mass grave.

Several weeks later, on April 15, 1945, British forces liberated the camp.

https://www.history.com/topics/world-war-ii/anne-frank-1

Busatti, it’s got what it takes

There’s a revered business association in Italy called the UISI, or the Unione Imprese Storiche Italiane, which in English means: the association of Italian Historical Businesses.

In order to become a member of this august group, a company must have been in business for over 150 years and owned by the same family that started the business originally.  This association was begun in Florence and only includes as members businesses that represent the great tradition and history for which Italy is known.

I only recently learned of this association when I visited a great textile store in the Oltrarno section of Florence.  There are no signs announcing this shop; you must be in the know to find it.

It isn’t hidden, au contraire, it is located smack dab between a very famous little artistic studio of the street artist, Clet, and the ancient church of San Nicola.

Check it out online and visit it if you are in the market for some fine Italian textiles: towels, sheets, draperies, and some ceramics.

 

 

Sizzling summer in Florence

L’estate e’ arrivata!!!  Summer has arrived!  Big time!  Florence is sizzling, even earlier this year that the last 2!

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The thermostat rarely dips below 90, even at night, it seems.

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The city of Florence prepared these great posters of Estate Fiorentina 2019! I think Dante is going to want to drop that red cloak, or maybe he just finished swimming in the Arno and is using the coat as a beach towel?  That makes perfect sense to my heat-fried brain!

But, in Florence, you can always cool off with these summertime fruits (candies)!  Have a great summer, wherever you are!

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P.S. I’m not a fan of hot summer weather.  I’m planning another getaway next month.  Here’s a hint: fullsizeoutput_1187

 

I’m praying London’s weather stays like this!!

The 500th anniversary of Leonardo’s death

2019 is the 500th anniversary of the death of Leonardo da Vinci and Italy is doing it up right to mark the occasion.  All over Italy, but especially in Tuscany and Florence in particular, and in Milan, exhibitions are celebrating his art and life.

I love the comic relief one get’s from a poster like the one below.  At least we can have a little fun with the fact that he often wrote backwards!

 

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